5 Signs Your Content Machine Is Underperforming And How To Fix It

The relentless rhythm of content production and publishing can be demanding for content marketers, writers and authors of all stripes. Take a quick step back from the whirring engine in order to make sure that your content machine is firing on all cylinders.

Here are a few signs that your content production is underperforming, along with ways to address any hiccups:

  1. The compliance approval is the longest stage in the process.

In most organizations, it takes a good amount of time to plan, prepare and vet good content. Getting compliance sign-off–especially in financial services–is crucial. But it shouldn’t be the limiting factor.

Action: sit down with your review and compliance stakeholders to check the agreed service level, identify and address bottlenecks. Make this a regular thing.

  1. The four-eyes principle applies only to nerds.

The four-eyes principle means that one person writes, another person reviews. Surprisingly, a marketing head at one firm I spoke to admitted to me that they do not check what they produce before it’s published. Unsurprisingly, that firm’s communications often have spelling mistakes, translation errors and poor grammar.

Action: hire an editor, or–at a minimum–implement peer review inhouse. If you don’t bother to read your material, why should your clients?

  1. Your content never made it out the door.

I’ve actually seen a department in one organization deliver ‘finished’ content to internal teams (without a compliance check)–simply hoping that it would be pushed to the outside world by others. It wasn’t. As a result, no prospects or clients ever actually saw the content.

Action: The 80/20 rule does not apply to reaching your audience. Go the full distance. Diffuse content in various formats across an array of communications channels for maximum impact.

  1. You cannot remember the last time you discussed topic ideas with colleagues.

Sadly, some firms hire people to produce content without managing the content process–e.g. no editorial calendar, no key topics, non-existent or constantly revised key messages. While this makes the content producer’s job rather easy (little oversight, vague objectives), it makes achieving success quite difficult.

Action: make content production an organization-wide effort. Good content is a team sport. Your colleagues will have different views and suggestions for improvement that boost the quality of your content.

  1. No one reads your content.

The most severe warning sign that your content machine is underperforming is also the most difficult to resolve. Perhaps you have good content in the wrong place and thus need to adjust the channel mix. Or maybe the messaging doesn’t relate to the audience. Or the tone is off.

Action: Conduct a full review of your content marketing program, from objectives and process to result measurement and analysis. If everything appear to be in good order, use market research techniques (panels, surveys) to gain more insight directly from your target audience. If all else fails, find new ways to integrate existing content into your organization’s activities and look for feedback through that route.